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singles/eps - october2010



Maybeshewill – To the Skies From a Hillside (Field)

A welcome return from Leicester’s Maybeshewill who have put together one of their most considered and fluid tracks to date. There’s a nice flow to the trademark piano melodies. Then there are those guitars that crash in. What a guitar sound that is – like laser powered buzz saws or something. Pin sharp as always and a precursor for good things to come from their upcoming tour and new album. 8/10
http://www.maybeshewill.net

SB


 

The Lines – El Matador (Amboy Road)

Is that a little touch of The Rapture I can feel sneaking in here via the West Midland’s The Lines? Nice choppy guitar hooks and a lot of high hat action complete the image. But it is a nice little tune so I’ll be keeping tabs on these blighters. 8/10
www.wearethelines.com

SB


 

Chris Singleton and the Distractions – Lose It/Lou Reed (Ireland)

This is a seriously difficult release to review. On the one hand I get the feeling that Chris Singleton and the Distractions sound like a house band. A very good one, but a house band all the same. For instance in ‘Lou Reed’, deploying the Velvet Underground style guitar parts just seems a bit too literal and lacking subtlety. On the other hand, every so often it turns into something like ELO (which for reasons best not discussed I have a bit of a soft spot for).

‘Lose It’ is equally schizophrenic – is it Kula Shaker? Is it Bowie? I think it’s very good but I’m just left feeling a bit dazed by the melange of influences deployed in just a double A side single. 6/10
www.singletonmusic.com

SB

 
 

Louis Elliot & The Embers – Runaway Night (Fullfill)

Now I’m getting on a bit apparently (as I was informed by a younger fellow drinker in a bar last night) but I’m not sure I’m quite ready just yet to start spending my time listening to this kind of MOR folky stuff. Don’t get me wrong – Louis Elliot and co don’t produce a bad racket, but they seem more suited to playing wedding receptions than lightening my days. 5/10

SB

 
 

Orphan Boy – Some Frontier (Concrete)

This is vastly different from what I was expecting after hearing their previous single ‘Pop Song’. ‘Some Frontier’ is the song that Adam and the Ants never recorded. The big thumping drums and shout along choruses – pure spectacle. There’s perhaps a touch of The Twilight Sad in the shouty vocal but overall it’s quite a clever little song. 7/10
www.orphanboy.co.uk

SB

 

Mojo Fury – The Mann (Graphite)

An interesting track here from Belfast’s The Mann. You’re left wondering just how heavy and rocky this is after listening to it. Initially you’re thinking the big slabs of guitar are definitely metal orientated. But then you ponder that the chorus is actually pretty catchy in a more mainstream indie way (albeit delivered with a bit more venom than your average Keane song). And that’s a clever trick. 8/10
www.myspace.com/mojofuryband
watch video to 'The Mann'

SB


 

Conchitas – Burn Baby Burn (Delicious)

Conchitas it transpires, features our old friend Elena who has graced the Tasty turntables on numerous occasions previously. And despite a reasonably adept electro sleaze production, she still has a terrible voice, gravelly and pitchless. This ends up being a bit painful. 3/10
www.myspace.com/conchitas

SB

 
 

Morcheeba – Blood Like Lemonade (PIAS)

This is the title track from Morcheeba’s 7th album which was released this summer. Unlike the apparent subject matter (‘an ex-priest vampire bounty killer who goes around seeking revenge on bad guys and drinking their blood like lemonade’) this is extreme chill out. It’s also very much in the style of Morcheeba’s biggest previous hit ‘The Sea’ – it’s probably long enough ago now for us to slightly forget that one and therefore be able to just enjoy this one. 7/10
www.morcheeba.com

SB


 

Films of Colour – Actions / Circles (Label Fandango)

Moody stuff from London’s Films of Colour and their memorably named singer Andy Clutterbuck. Apparently there’s a story about the band receiving some support from Coldplay’s Chris Martin (take that as you will) but perhaps not coincidentally there is a touch of Martin in Clutterbuck’s vocals. Otherwise the music comes over as a touch darker – I’d guess this was music from somewhere more bleak than Notting Hill. It’s got a touch of the epic about it although personally I’ve never been a fan of music that seems to eek out a perfectly good 3 minute song to over 4 minutes. ‘Circles’ introduces some further interesting twiddles and bleeps in the form of an Underworldy synth effect towards the outro. This is polished stuff, perhaps a little too polished. 7/10
www.filmsofcolour.com

SB

 
 

Echofela – Girls Girls Ladies (Ignite)

It’s a near certain fact that any man who refers to ‘ladies’ is seldom as chivalrous as the word would lead you to believe. So it is with this song as Echofela babble on about girls and ladies and how they like them all. I don’t think it is being ironic - it is a bit difficult to hear too much detail in the garbled vocals – so I’ll just have to put it down as plain simplistic sexism no better than your standard gangsta rap. 5/10
www.echofela.com

SB

 
 

Hunters, Run! – EP3

Cracking name for a band, but sadly this particular release fails to live up to the promise of the nomenclature. It’s a slow shoe gazy affair with occasional swirls of feedback ringing out – that’s OK. But there were several times during ‘Life of Crime’ when I had to check that the vocals weren’t being applied by Chris Rea. The track also ends rather unsatisfactorily – just fizzling out. ‘Oh, My Ageless Brother’ is a little more upbeat and has more of the feel of Husker Du vibe about it, but again I find the mix a little strange, it’s like the loud parts have all been strangled down somewhat and consequently the track feels a little claustrophobic instead of soaring. Elements of promise which could be explored further though. 6/10

SB

 

Burn the Fleet – Black Holes (Good Fortune/Walnut Tree)

Burn the Fleet have a nice technical style about them – lovely ringing guitars during the verses of ‘Black Holes’ and a singer who actually sings. But when it comes to the big choruses where the guitar pedals kick in, it just seems to lack a bit of oomph about it. I’d really like to hear it kick off but there’s a strange flat quality to it instead. While it may frustrate a noise-monger like myself, conversely it may make this track have a broader commercial appeal by not alienating any noise-phobic types. 6/10
www.myspace.com/burnthefleetband

SB

 
 

Loadstar – Link to the Past/Rapidas (Ram)

Apparently Loadstar is the new moniker for producers Xample and Lomax. What is not new is the synth sound at the start of ‘Link to the Past’ which I’m sure has been lifted off the Dragons’ Den TV music. But things heat up nicely once the breakbeats and pitch bending kick in. I’m not sure where to place this – it’s not out and out danceable but it’s not out and out chill out able either. ‘Rapidas’ is pretty firmly in Pendulum territory, especially since their foray into Mediterranean grooves with previous single ‘The Island’. 7/10
www.myspace.com/xampleandlomax

SB

 
 

Straight Lines – Say it For Your Sake (Xtra Mile)

Straight Lines are really quite good, a bit like a less earnest version of Biffy Clyro. They’ve got a singer with a formidable set of lungs and they seem to have riffs to burn. Production is spot on and so all the stars are aligned – this will be the time for Straight Lines. 8/10
www.myspace.com/straightlines

SB

 
 

Darren Hayman and the Secondary Modern – Calling Out Your Name Again (Fortuna Pop!)

You’d be hard pressed not find something on this release which wouldn’t at least pique your interest, even if you didn’t end up loving it. From the main title track, a happy pop duet with Emma-Lee Moss (of Emmy the Great fame), the strange reggae influenced ‘Beach Head’, the Bowie-folk of ‘Until We Got Bored’ right through to the glitch folk of ‘Essex Arms’, Hayman consistently turns out songs with skill and wit. 7/10
www.hefnet.com

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Sophie Hunger – Your Personal Religion

A perfect example of why Sophie Hunger’s ‘1983’ album was such a hit, ‘Your Personal Religion’ demonstrates several of Hunger’s fortes. There’s a knack for the slightly unusual melody with parts that seem to slide and tessellate against each other in a slightly awkward but loveable way. There’s also her impressive voice – part PJ Harvey, part Michelle Shocked. Excellent. 8/10
www.sophiehunger.com

SB

 
 

Universal You – Iskala

Well this cover version of a famous Russian song marks a much improved effort from Universal You who less than impressed with their last outing, ‘Your Sin City’. It shows off Gulzhan Ibraveya’s vocals to good effect and matches it up with a very pleasing little tune. Perhaps they should always copy other people’s songs. 6/10
www.universalyou.co.uk

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Kill Cassidy – 14:11/Everyone to the Dancemat (Sugar Shack)

’14:11’ is a pretty competent track with the kind of soaring guitar parts you’d expect from a Chris Sheldon mixed song. The only area which lets it down is when the otherwise excellent vocalist reaches for a falsetto in the choruses but doesn’t quite make it. Result is it’s a bit painful. The opening to ‘Everyone to the Dancemat’ instantly brings to mind Kings of Leon. Apart from the fact that bloody falsetto comes into play again. Time for someone to have a word because otherwise I’d have given this a really good review. 6/10
www.myspace.com/killcassidy

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Clement Marfo and the Frontline – Champion (Kids)

Wowsers. This is almost certainly quite unlike anything you have ever heard of before. Marfo somehow manages to marry big bombastic rockmongous tunes with a poppy tune and some pretty serious rapping. The result could be shocking but it is very definitely pretty damned good. 8/10
www.myspace.com/clementmarfo

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Paris Suit Yourself – Craig Machinsky (Big Dada)

PSY are ostensibly a rock band. But there’s no simple way to categorise this wonderful din. It’s kind of heavily piano led but with a spatter gun of snare. And a gothic chanty vocal. And some playground style sing along bits. In short it’s a bit weird but very cool – I quite fancy listening to some more of this stuff. 8/10
www.bigdad.com

SB

 
 

Stellarscope - 'Call Me Destroyer' (Patetico)

Four track EP from a band whose music covers the heavier end of the Psychepop spectrum. Shoegrunge? 'The Age To Come' and 'killstealliedie' are just great, thrashing powerdriven effects laden pieces with metallic overtones, while you really should try and hear 'This Is Something New', a swirling, near hypnotic ballad that is both deleriously repetitive and gloriously overwrought and a real indication of the abilities of a band whose 'This Is Who We Are' album I was enthusing over a few months previously.
http://www.myspace.com/stellarscope

JG

 

Birdeatsbaby - 'Bigger Teeth'

What's the most accurate way to describe the music of Birdeatsbaby? Their combination of music hall reverie, acerbic lyricism and classical allusions, when combined with their quite startling musical skills and their quite lovely voices (even when the subject matter gets a bit gnarly) - all of this very nearly places the band in a category entirely their own. Their background obviously contains some theatrical elements and the parcel that their CD arrived in also contained a bundle of red feathers. Birdeatsbaby are at their very least mistresses of the gesture.

About the music: a gently plucked Spanish guitar introduces a tale of a vaguely sinister evening assignation, 'The Devil So Charming'. The delicate instrumentation provides a perfect backdrop for some cleverly phrased three part vocalising, and the whole piece is a spritely quadrille played out on a moonlit riverbank with the cello and violin giving the song another dimension entirely, and there's a refreshing directness about both it and its performers. 'The Replacement' is a breathlessly fast tale of female jealousies, a recurring theme in Birdeatsbaby's songwriting, and it fairly gallops along, piano and violin countering each other with mannered ferocity. 'Enemies Like Me' is a claustrophobic drum and bass led tale of divorce and hidden heartbreak, interspersed with howling strings and keyboard interruptions that develop into a mini-sonata of sorts at the songs end.

'Gone' is sheer mania, a tale of someone getting sacked from something over an argument, and its lyric spills across the daintily effusive tune like an overturned litre of vodka, is delivered with gleeful spite and is also, if your ears are sharp enough to follow the words, very funny indeed. Final track 'Rosary' slows everything down, a conventional ballad played entirely without the eccentric chutzpah Birdeatsbaby bring to the rest of their songs, although you will in all probability listen to it very near the edge of your seat, expecting crashing cymbals and/or incendiary cello at any moment.

Birdeatsbaby achieve everything they set out to. Their world is a dramatic, darkly glamorous place, where paranoia and barbed witticisms are the orders of the day and they are perhaps the most innovative and original band I've heard for a very long time. What's more, there's a full album on its way sometime next year - everyone get very excited NOW.
www.birdeatsbaby.co.uk

JG

 
 

Lorn – None on an Island (Ninja Tune)

Lorn seems like some kind of twisted musical genius. He effortless forges racks which warp and twist your imagination with demonic growls overlaying bleepy synths, crunching basslines and a gamut of other frankly scary effects. It can lead to a bewildering and at times discomforting experience but towards the end of this release, everything comes together beautifully in the broody but rhythmical and melodious ‘Until there is no end’ – not sure why it’s not the lead track but i guess good things come to those who wait. 8/10
www.myspace.com/lornnn

SB

 
 

RepoMen – Headlines (Phantom Power)

The title track of this is strangely subdued. It’s not just the fact that it ever really gets going until the horns kick in after 30 seconds – even after this point, there seems to be a stifled quality to what could be really uproarious choruses. What remains is a pretty but slightly stilted effort – believe me, I tried to turn it up really loud but still to little effect. ‘Flicker’ recalls more than a little taste of Shed Seven whereas ‘What We Do’ offers a nice glimpse of the clever lyrics at use throughout the EP. As a group these aren’t a bad set of songs but they all have their inherent weaknesses. Which is what makes the more experimental final track ‘Feed Me’ with its drone and very lo-fi delivery all the more refreshing. It has little in common with the more conforming song structures of its predecessors but still transfers a wonderful sense of trippy joy. 6/10
www.myspace.com/repomenuk

SB

 

The Gaslamp Killer – Death Gate (Brainfeeder)

There is something strange about the 2 minute opener ‘Fun Over 100’ which seems to over before it has even opened up as the strange intro to this pretty dark EP by Los Angeles based producer William Bensussen, who goes by the name The Gaslamp Killer. There is more than a passing north African influence in the sounds which are deployed by TGK and these are used within a very saturated overall sound which fills every bit of sonic space and shoves it full of beats, glitches and melodies. Occasionally this is a bit claustrophobic (‘When I’m in Awe’) but at other times surprises you by getting you jerking around in your seat along to the music (‘Carpool Dummy’). This is pretty edgy stuff, not your normal radio friendly stodge and all the better for it. But I’m still a little bit unsure whether I would want to plough through this again voluntarily. 6/10
www.thegaslampkiller.com

SB

 
 

Gallery 47 – 11th October Routine (Farmyard Records)

Yawn, another singer songwriter? It’s true – I get heartily bored of some of the mediocre stuff which wends its way through the mail to us here at Tasty Towers. All of which makes so much more of an occasion when the good stuff comes through. And so it is with Nottingham based Gallery 47, the moniker of singer songwriter Jack Peachey.

It strikes me that Peachey has at least three things which set him apart from loads of others. Firstly the boy can write a good tune. Secondly he can play, utilising his idiosyncratic finger-picked style to create lovely little fills and intros and thirdly he’s got a wonderfully engaging voice which dances along with the music rather than just being laid over a tune like some dull-eyed Cowell-alike. He’s not afraid to mess about – the nice little crunches and glitches of ‘Dolce’ being evidence to this and injecting a further dimension to the already luscious tune. There’s even a hint of the Zepellin in the gentle stompalong track ‘Duck Feet’ and I certainly am in no need of the secret track at the end to tell you all that Jack Peachey is seriously talented – watch this space. 9/10

SB

 
 

Rockburn – Red Dress EP

I’m afraid that for all the posturing about wanting play proper classic rock and roll with a 21st century twist, this title track is still a lumbering dinosaur that belongs well in the last century. Although there’s the semblance of a decent song in there somewhere it’s just a big mess of over-ambitious drums and frankly sounds poorly performed. Sadly this pattern continues throughout – what might have been intended to give a big live vibe to the drums just succeeds in creating a boomy mess that is difficult to unravel the rest of the music from. Some of the quieter tracks such as ‘The Last Stop’ are a little more successful as the drums have chance to die down a little before being given another ferocious belting, but basically I just don’t think this sound is working for me. 5/10
www.myspace.com/rockburn06

SB

 
 

Aaron Wright – Behold a Pale Horse (D-Set)

I’m sorry but I can only just about make out every tenth or so word that Aaron Wright sings. Whether it’s my ears truly fuzzed up after listening to Rockburn’s drums for 20 minutes or it’s Wright’s rich dialect, the result is equally unsatisfactory given that the melodies seem to be deliberately trimmed down in order to give the voice centre stage. Did he keep mentioning a ‘gammy knee’ in the opening track or was it the title ‘Origami Me’? And so it was that our relationship was sullied from the outset an no amount of winsome, faintly Simon & Garfunkling or light Americana could win me round, I just found it dull. 4/10
www.aaronwright.com

SB

 
 

2000 Fast Women – Letters from Vienna (Wrapt Up)

There’s a nice combination of gentle 80s ska mixed with some really incongruent B-movie sound effects at work here. Or you could say it is a very ‘white’ version of hip hop which practically marries it to indie or emo in places. This could well be genre defining. It could just be a blatant grab for market share. Either way it sounds pretty good and it sure is interesting. 7/10
www.myspace.com/2000fastwomen

SB

 

Little Comets – Isles (Dirty Hit)

Little Comets may be relatively unknown since forming in Newcastle a couple of years ago but I feel things are about to change for them. ‘Isles’ is a genius song – like a slowed down version of Blur’s ‘Country House’ or Kaiser’s ‘I Predict a Riot’ – it’s neither of these pop hits but something far more valuable instead. Strangely euphoric and morbid at the same time, the staccato timing and jerky guitars add a further level of intensity to what is already a pretty taut song writing effort. 8/10

SB

 
 

The Blue Aeroplanes – China Brilliance Automotive (Albino Two)

A single release to mark the buyout of a music venue? What next, a gig to celebrate getting some flyers printed? A video to commemorate the return of a repaired guitar? Ignore my ramblings for now though as I also quite like this song. It’s nice mix of psychedelic shoe gaze and 90’s baggy indie – it rumbles on and on in its own dreamy little way and all thoughts of corporate takeovers just seem to evaporate. 7/10
www.theblueaeroplanes.com

SB

 
 

Tina Lie – Twilight Hour (SIWU Norway)

This is a pretty dismal affair which I really can’t see forcing its way into my affections, even if I was on heavily psychotropic drugs. Lillehammer native Lie doesn’t do herself any justice (or maybe just has a rotten voice) as she growls her way through 3 minutes of uninspired mid-west radio rock like a laryngitic Tina Turner. Back to the ski jump with you. 3/10
www.tinalie.com

SB

 
 

The Good Natured – Be My Animal/Prisoner (KIDS)

Is this taking the piss? While most bands are happy just to churn out one great track in a year, The Good Natured just don’t do bad ones at all, it’s so easy they can knock out this double AA side killer without breaking sweat. Sure this London 3-piece possess one of the most enigmatic singers (Sarah) on the block today but there’s no shortage of genius in the band as a whole. The pop noir of Prisoner is superb, almost Banshee-esque. 9/10
http://www.myspace.com/thegoodnatured
watch video to 'Be My Animal'

SB

 
 

Meet The Storm – Sailing On A Broken Compass

Noisy! Shouting! Brutal! Do you like The Gallows? Cancer Bats? (whose lead singer, Liam, actually shows up on this) Do you like the possibility that you might catch an elbow to the ribs while going crazy to some people who are as sweaty and violent as you? Then this'll be great. I was listening to this on the way to law school and I was THIS close to cutting class, drinking all day and waking up in a different county! It sounds a lot like the Gallows and Cancer Bats and they'll probably do pretty well opening for those guys...and that's it. But I really enjoyed this EP and I'll look out for them.

Christopher Carney

 
 

Klaxons – Twin Flames (Polydor)

A nice little compact song here from Klaxons which will do their burgeoning reputation no harm at all. It’s a scuzzy backing track with some loosely falsetto vocals applied over the top – you’ll just have to believe me when I say it sounds better than my description. 7/10
www.klaxons.net

SB

 
 

Secret Rivals – Start Fires EP (Josaka)

This is a bitter sweet experience for me. On reading the press release and the news that Secret Rivals formed partly due to a shared obsessions of records like Idlewild’s ‘Captain’, I’m reminded that I leant mine out to a ‘friend’ ages ago and never got it back. Git. On the plus side Secret Rivals offer up a summery upbeat DIY sound which is a little Bearsuit, a little Four Marys, a little Chapter 24 but generally quite lovely and gawky. 7/10
www.myspace.com/secretrivalsband

SB

 
 

Bearsuit – Please Don’t Take Him Back (Fortuna Pop!)

Speaking of Bearsuit...the latest outing from Norwich’s finest (and I am including Delia Smith in the competition) welcomely arrives on the CD player and is another marvellous slice of wonky synth pop galvanised by a slightly beefier rhythm section than some of their earlier records. All of which equals loveliness to the ears. 7/10
www.bearsuit.co.uk

SB

 
 

Escort Knights – I Don’t Know Your Name / Hole in the Heart (Waltzer)

Leeds based apparently and used in a large advertising campaign to herald the arrival of the new Leeds super-arena-corporate music bowl? I missed that. But then I don’t get out as much as I should do. However, it’s fair to say that Escort Knights sport a nicely laid back indie funk groove, a little like The Sunshine Underground having undergone calmative hypnotherapy. It’s refreshingly grown up and well groomed stuff, even if ‘Hole in the Heart’ does sound a little 90’s pseudo Beatles retro. 7/10
www.escortknightsmusic.com

SB

 
 

British India – Vanilla EP

This four track EP from the sunny climes of Melbourne promises great things from British India. They seem to have such a lot going for them and a pretty broad appeal. On the one hand they can be darkly moody, like a Redjetson then next minute ‘Vanilla’ is exploding into a joyful Manicsy pick sliding guitar furore. It’s really is quite smashing. Throw in a few meaningful samples and an uproarious finale in ‘Because of You’ and you have a pretty exciting EP. 8/10
www.myspace.com/britishindia

SB

 
 

Jumping Ships – Orientation (Glass Bottom)

A six-track EP? Come on guys – it’s half eleven and I only got about 5 hours sleep last night before being awoken at an ungodly hour by the upstairs neighbour’s children tap-dancing on my ceiling. It’s a damned good thing that Jumping Ships are very good. ‘Matterhorn’ resplendently kicks things off with a mix of the melodic, the mathy and some nice ringing guitar lines all overcoming an intro of a pretty gutsy wall of feedback.

I also like the punchy vocal rounds at work in ‘The Whole Truth’ which overlay quite a frantic tune like an over anxious Tired Irie. Jumping Ships are masters at the choppy time changes and clever dynamic use of guitars. However there were a couple of occasions where the spasmodic timing seemed to chop about and change so frequently that it became a little bit annoying. But hey, half an hour later and I’m still awake and I’m still listening attentively to the nicely rounded closing track ‘Temper Temperamental’. Job’s a good ‘un Jumping Ships. 7/10
www.myspace.com/jumpingships

SB

 
 

Dan Korn – Dustbowl EP (Harrison Music)

You’ve got to hand it to Dan Korn – he’s not going to be put off doing something completely odd. ‘Dustbowl’ is a strangely upbeat ode to the (ultimately disastrous) Joad family in ‘The Grapes of Wrath’. I say strangely upbeat because it is a pretty bleak story.

Second thing to strike me is that the whole EP has either being recorded using very dodgy equipment or there is something wrong with my disc – the sounds constantly fuzzes out giving it a nostalgic analogue quality. ‘Song for Syd’ (Barrett) features a nicely descending melody in the chorus which is reminiscent of Bowie’s ‘Bewlay Brothers’ and again ‘Like a Dove’ has bitter sweet overtones, performed brightly and even rocking out in a schizophrenic way. But whereas its preceding tracks have an air of the theatrical and lack of sincerity about them, the most poignant track is saved for last in ‘Lost Sea Shanty’ – simple guitar and voice put across the feeling of lost love better than anything else on offer in this EP. 7/10

SB

 
 

Lizzie Nightingale – Left Right Left (25 Hour Convenience)

‘Left Right Left’ – yes it’s a thinly veiled militaristic sounding marching song complete with dutifully performed snare drum. I’m afraid Nightingale’s overly warbly vocals do nothing to improve matters – I just can’t get my head round liking this at all, to the point where I wonder why she is releasing it – surely she must have recorded better tracks than this? 3/10
www.myspace.com/lizzienightingale

SB

 

South Central – Demons (Citizen)

This is a bit of an assault on the eardrums and in the best possible way. South Central return with this hard hitting techno-house track replete with suitably demonic vocoder and grinding synths. It’s just damn fine. And if that wasn’t enough there’s a couple of equally good remixes thrown in, the suitably Germanic sounding ‘Nietzsche versus Nurture’ and then, just when you think it’s time to give your lugholes a rest there follows a massive 30 minute sampler remix track which demonstrates just why South Central are one of the hottest producing talents around. 9/10
www.myspace.com/southcentralmusic

SB