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singles/eps - april 2011



Braids – Lemonade

Easily one of the longest singles I’ve ever heard, Lemonade is almost seven minutes of the purest, most dreamy pop. Braids have been popping up on all the right blogs and in all the right magazines: the hype machine is abuzz with nice things to say about this band and it’s easy to see why.

The track itself sounds like post-orgasmic bliss converted into music. It’s ethereal and super-layered baroque pop that flows and swells and ebbs at its own pace. Lemonade is the most soporific, unhurried and just jawdroppingly lovely track that you’ll have heard in a long time.

Dan Shields


 

Toy Horses – Interrupt

I’m afraid that no amount of manilla card CD cases and hand printed logos are going to make my heart warm to Toy Horses. Their style seems firmly stuck in a retro vibe already well trodden by the likes of the Beatles, ELO and Ocean Colour Scene. The first two of those bands were good enough to master plenty of other styles as well but I’m not one to listen out attentively for yet more winsome 60’s psychedelic pop. 5/10
www.toyhorsemusic.com

SB


 

Nicole Atkins – You Come to Me

I find it very difficult to take artists seriously when they stare out from their front covers, over the shoulder with a sultry pout, no matter how nice their golden peacock adorned blue silk kimono looks). But unexpectedly, for Nicole Atkins I’ll make an exception – this song is a bit of a weird belter. Big production which oddly distances Atkins warbly vocals from the big beats and driving melodies makes the whole thing hang together against the odds. It soars, it plunges, it basically rocks. 8/10

SB

 

 
 

Shades of Rhythm – Sweet Sensation 2011 (Cheap Thrills)

Disappointing. It might have set a few ecstasy fuelled raves alight in the early nineties but times move on. Even with remixes, I find it a bit regressive to go back to something like this (which hasn’t aged particularly well when you compare it to contemporaries such as 808 State). A quick nostalgic nod of recognition back to the rave scene is enough for me – let’s move on. 5/10

SB

 
 

Flash Fiktion – Capsules of Sun (Split Records)

There’s something undeniably 8-bit about ‘Capsules of Sun’ – it’s an 80’s computer geek’s wet dream of a song. And beyond the obvious sounds there is a taint of new romanticism creeping out, that is, if you shove the meringue rhythms t one side for a second. To summarise – it’s quite complex but bloody good fun. 8/10
www.myspace.com/flashfiktion

SB

 

Paris Suit Yourself – Sometimes (Big Dada)

It seems that I may be the only Tasty mug who actually likes Paris Suit Yourself. Vive la difference and all that but I can understand others’ ambivalence – they are a bit of weird bunch. They really remind me of a naughty OK Go – lobbing in falsettos and skronky guitars in place of clever videos on treadmills. And ‘Sometimes’ is no different, although in farness it is a bit more conventional than some of their previous stuff. Not so the remixes which will leave you scratching your head. 8/10
www.bigdada.com

SB


Shibuya Crossings – At Eight in a Spanish Bar (Typically Magic)

The sound of Teenage Fanclub is alive and well (though not so my speakers which received a sharp tap to sort out the extreme fuzz coming out of them before I realised that it wasn’t in fact a fault). For anyone who missed out first time round, this will offer a wonderfully liberated garage guitar band sound and vibe of freedom that is difficult not to warm to. For the rest of us, well it’s nice to be a little nostalgic every now and then also. 7/10
www.myspace.com/shibuyacrossings

SB

 

Dana Jade – Galang / Little Sister (Priestess)

This shouldn’t work. It really shouldn’t. Someone brought up on soca and reggae in the Carribean, sojourning in grungey New York and singing in a 22 piece alt-girl choir sounds like a potential car crash of musical styles. But Dana Jade has actually created a wonderful symbiosis of rusty stringed strat, Latin rhythms and big beats with a cover of M.I.A.’s ‘Galang’. Still absolutely no idea what ‘Galang’ is – I thought it was like ginger but apparently not.

‘Little Sister’ is less successful, conforming more to a traditional indie sounding pattern, very much like Skunk Anansie actually. But even then there are a few little ska touches in the mid-section which give it a particular Dana Jade flavour. 7/10
www.myspace.com/danajademusic

SB


 

Giant Steps – Tolerate

Old school rhythm and blues of a type rocked out by Led Zep somehow just seems a bit of an anachronism to nowadays. ‘Tolerate’ is probably a bit to staccato and minimal to fall into that kind of company but then neither does it rock out. It’s stuck between one and t’other and as such it’s hard to really get into it. 6/10

SB

 
 

From a City in Ruins – Fin! Fin! Fin!

Grimsby never did quite make it to city status, beaten to the mark by other such low spots as Sunderland but never the less, it’s highly likely that the title of this band is just a little bit autobiographical. But despite hailing from this backwater, From a City in Ruins sound impressively worldy wise and self confident with this track. Sonically it’s like a mix of Six By Seven, Tired Irie, and Punish the Atom – all fellow east Midlanders. A coincidence? Who knows but if it is then it’s a happy coincidence. B-side ‘Introverts’ is also gobsmackingly good. Almost good enough to make me want to go back to Grimsby more often, but not quite – once a year to see my Gran is more than enough. 9/10
www.myspace.com/fromacityinruins

SB

 
 

My First Tooth – Sleet and Snow (Alcopop!)

It seems to me that Folk is the new rock n roll, if you know what I mean. Or in this case, folk-pop is the new rock n roll. The rather untopical ‘Sleet and Snow’ sounds very similar to a pared down version of Mumford and Sons, so much so that the less charitable reviewer might suggest this is a blatant attempt to cash in on their current popularity. I’ll err ever so slightly in favour of the defendants on account of it being a jolly little jaunt of a song but eyes will be watching and ears checking for any future comparisons. 7/10
www.myspace.com/myfirsttooth

SB

 

The Band of Holy Joy – On the Ground Where John Wesley Walked / Black Middens (Radio Joy)

Slight happy-clappy Christian alert with words like ‘Holy Joy and ‘John Wesley’ included here but I think we can safely avoid any religious overtones. The lands where John Wesley walked originally were pretty bleak and probably quite boggy, being as he is from Epworth on the Isle of Axholme, the country’s most desolate spot (my view – don’t bother checking on Wikipedia). The track? Oh yes, well rather nice lanquid folk-punk from this band who have been around for nearly 25 years. 7/10
www.bandofholyjoy.co.uk

SB

 

Sound of Guns – Breakwater (Distiller)

I like the sound of big drums on a track – I decided that earlier in the week. I’m also quite partial to a bit of urgent repetition. For that reason, despite their ostensibly melodic rock, this track from Sound of Guns pretty much ticks the boxes as the big drum track thumps muscularly along under a nice, simple, Therapy-esque guitar riff. Even the epic choruses are kept in check to keep me satisfied. Good lads. 7/10
www.soundofguns.com

SB

 
 

Fight Like Apes – Jenny Kelly (Model Citizen)

I’m ashamed to say I have no recollection whatsoever of the 1990’s low budget Aussie sci-fi series ‘The Girl from Tomorrow’ or its character Jenny Kelly who forms the subject for this track. It was a bit crap by all accounts. I’m not entirely sure what to make of this single by the same name though. It’s a bit ‘Girl from Mars’ by compatriots Ash as sung out at a drunken karaoke excursion. Not a bad thing but leaving you feeling a little uncomfortable. 7/10
www.fightlikeapes.com

SB

 
 

Husky Rescue – Fast Lane (Catskills)

A wonderful start to the month from Scando indie poppers Husky Rescue who knock together a pretty music box intro into a rockabilly rhythm accompanied by the always sublime Reeta-Leena Korhola on vocals. We not share their Finnish midnight sun but as they days get longer, Husky Rescue provide the perfect start to the summer. 8/10
www.husky-rescue.net

SB

 
 

Melodica, Melody And Me - 'Come Outside' (Everybody's Stalking)

No, not a remake of Mike Sarne's 1963 novelty hit (look it up), but this is by anyone's standard a fine piece of mellow summery folk nouveau, evocative and skilfully performed, replete with mandolins and call and response choruses and the sunmmer of 2011 is, thanks to these Brixton troubadors, well and truly upon us, or at least me. B-side 'Ode To Victor Jara' might also provoke a comedy response, along the lines of " 10/6 in pre-decimal coinage" and it does posess an authentically 60s protest folk vibe of along the lines of (say) Bert Jansch and Julie Felix, including the chilling lyrical denoument to its cheerful campfire guitar tune.
www.everybodysstalking.com

JG

 
 

Balkans - 'Edita B' (Double Phantom)

Growling electronics and hissing drumbeats open up into guitar rattle and more searing electronics. The chorus takes a leap into another song entirely. From Atlanta, Georgia, Balkans make more of a go of upping the artpunk stakes than I've heard for a month or two, thundering into life like a herd of aggrieved wilderbeeste equipped with Roland drum programmes and junk shop Telecasters. Quite a cloud of dust they're raising, anyways.
www.doublephantom.com

JG

 

Extra Life – Ripped Heart EP (LoAF)

Ever get a bit depressed about hearing another formulaic indie band being pedalled out for ubiquitous mass consumption? Yep, me too. I’m not a stickler for technical competence, lyrical wit or epic charisma but I do like my music to evoke some kind of emotional response, good or bad. On this note, Extra Life will definitely not disappoint.

Apparently their most commercial work to date, do not be fooled – this is way out there, especially the title track. Extra Life are prog, goth, folk and classical compositions all rolled into one (then oftentimes, broken up and left in pieces again). At their most accessible think of Tool’s Maynard in a chamber choir (‘Run Cold’). At their most obtuse, there’s little more than beat poetry set to words with implausible pauses impregnated by little gothic strings. Extra Life’s singer and founder, Charlie Looker has a wholesome voice which oscillates up and down scales and even touches on a hint of romanticism in final track ‘Elegy’, even though it features some pretty gruesome subject matter. You wouldn’t put this EP on the CD player to get the party started (leave that to Pink) but it certainly gives more than just a small pause for thought. 8/10
www.l-o-a-f.com

SB

 
 

Neon Choir – Animal EP (self release)

I was drawn in by the freakish bird-man-head artwork which for obvious reasons reminded me of Irvine Welsh’s Maribou Stork nightmares, but was left feeling sadly short changed by this insipid EP. A couple of tracks are really dreary and would be shameful at an open mic night (‘Sunshine’ being a prime example.) 6 tracks here and none that I can recall tapping a toe to – that can’t be a good sign. 5/10
www.myspace.com/neonchoir

SB

 
 

The Voluntary Butler Scheme – The Chevreul EP (Split)

The Voluntary Butler Scheme, a grand title for the bedroom musical musings of Rob Jones offer up a senses-dizzying array of effects and loops with this EP. There’s a bit of Ninja Tune/DJ Food style sampling going on in ‘Satisfactory Substitute’, there’s a bit of glitch in ‘D.O.P.L., a bit of twee Casio-pop in ‘Do the Hand Jive’. IN fact there’s a whole lot going on. Which is interesting but also leaves your head spinning a bit by the end. 6/10

SB

 

The Death Set – We Are Going Anywhere Man (Counter)

I think the Death Set are actually more punk than a lot of bands who openly claim to be punk, even if the Death Set themselves might not class themselves as a punk band, being as they are mainly electronic. But the clattery aesthetic and wanton vocals are very much a punk thing. Oh, and deciding to cover a Cure song while throwing up is also quite punk. Still sounds like a bloody racket mind you. 6/10
www.thedeathset.com

SB

 
 

Ambershift – Russian Doll

Despite starting off like this could be a little bit noodly, Ambershift really crank it up with Russian Doll and find a track which is the perfect balance between vocalist Dave’s moody vocals and the Bunnymen-esque urgency of Ben Clements’guitars. There’re also a damn handsome band if the video is to be believed.
www.ambershift.net

SB

 
 

Ulver – February MMX

A bit like their title, Ulver seem like a bit of an anachronism. In their formulaic years, Ulver were pioneers of the Norwegian black metal scene. Now in february 2010, this track is about as proggy as prog can get with big synths, wind instruments and meandering melodies. It’s got the slick production of fellow K-scoper Steven Wilson but little of the appeal. 6/10
www.myspace.com/ulver1

SB

 
 

Arnaud Rebotini – Personal Dictator (Blackstrobe)

The more observant of you will have spotted the link between Robotini and Blackstrobe records being that Robotini’s alter ego is in fact the act Blackstrobe. The apple does not fall far from the tree here with a pretty hard techno track with Backstrobe’s particular goth take on the genre. This isn’t dance round the handbags stuff – it’s hard as nails, more like the sound of one hundred metallic moths getting zapped on an electrocutor. As happy coincidences would go, my listening experience, due to a shuffle play error, started with the Hacker remix which is arguably a little bit more accessible and possibly even better. Strong stuff. 8/10

SB

 
 

Black Market Serotonin – Deadbyfiveoclock EP (Superstar Destroyer)

Not ones to do things by halves, on this, the band’s first proper release, they unfurl 5 epically long tracks that each manage to combine several strands of rock past and present. Unsurprisingly in such lengthy compositions there’s certainly elements of prog that creep in (is it prog month?) but any potential over-indulgence is equally counterbalanced by slabs of metal riffery, grungey honesty and intricate musicality. The overdriven and overdubbed tuned down guitars in ‘Revelation One’ are immense but cunningly counterpointed by a deft key part (not dissimilar to the type of thing that Maybeshewill have been turning out over the past couple of years). This is an EP of real substance - prepare to be impressed. 8/10

SB

 

Joan as Policewoman – Nervous (PIAS)

It’s an ouvre that I rarely stray into with any relish, but when Joan Wasser releases another one of her own particular takes on the soul genre it makes me sit up and take notice. It’s not the schmaltzy regressive stuff that Amy Winehouse churns out, it’s a vibrant new take on the scene which isn’t afraid to throw in a bit of Moog and programming. Or maybe I just like the fact that Wasser seems to take any opportunity she can to get her hairy armpits out for photographs. 8/10
www.joanaspolicewoman.com

SB

 
 

Nick Campell – Brick Scrap / I Love FLG (Blood Music)

Yes, you guessed it, another French producer/DJ. Very common name in France Campell. It seems like Monsieur Nick has had himself locked away in a darkened room ad has been trying to summon the devil via the medium of techno. ‘Brick Scrap’ is wildly oscillating, sharp edged track that is probably only for real hardcore techno fans and the wildly drug affected. Reminds me of the scene from Peep Show where Mark is in a gay club and has pretended to drop an E and is listening to the DJ ‘taking it up, taking it , taking it up then taking it down, taking it down, taking it down’ according to his companion played by Kevin Bishop. ‘I Love FLG’ is equally remorseless (and I don’t mean that in a critical way) – combining the hard edge of Jeff Mills with Carl Cox’s lighter moments. 7/10

SB

 
 

The Procession – Sometimes EP (Circular)

I really liked the intro like an eerie warbly, submarine feedback but it rapidly becomes apparent that ‘Sometimes’ is a victory of production over song writing. Cleverly filtered vocals during the chorus are equally arresting but sit a bit like a rather luxuriant dollop of whipped cream atop a very unsatisfactory hot chocolate - the bass riff being our sweet, sickly liquid in this case. Throughout the EP I’m struck by the lack of ‘specialness about the tunes – it just all falls a bit limp, like an experiment in a sixth form college music room. But stuff me, they have still got a record deal. 5/10
www.theprocession.co.uk

SB

 
 

Emika – Count Backwards (Ninja Tune)

As well as getting a fantastic track you also get a bit of free health advice from Emika. Apparently if you are stressed, just count your birth date backwards or spell the month of your birth backwards and it kicks the logical side of your brain to kick into action, resulting in a feeling of calm – a coping mechanism for overwhelming moments of panic. Good stuff – I’ll try that next time EMI try to take us to court. The track is equal parts ethereal and dreamy then earth shudderingly bassy and screwed up – the perfect musical allegory to the subject matter. This is really what you should be listening to, not Adele. 9/10
www.ninjatune.net

SB

 
 

Tom Moriarty – Smile if You Wanna Get High (Driftwood)

It’s a fabulous message – no matter how grim things appear sometimes, it’s often better just get on with life and smile about it. For instance, when I find things aren’t going too well, I cheer myself up by watching The Commitments. And by the sound of it, this is what Tom Moriarty does too. 6/10
www.tommoriarty.com

SB

 
 

Heavy Hearts – I Love Music (Deep Thrills)

Uh-oh. It was beginning to feel like prog meets Techno week. Now I’m getting distinctly edgy reading about ‘weird house, forward thinking garage and leftfield electronica’. Out of one’s depth alert. As such, you I feel I can qualify the fact that I think this track is monotonous drivel. 4/10
www.heavyhearts.co.uk

SB

 
 

Billy Vincent – King Island Coyote (Something Nothing)

Folky alt-country (but not too alt) fronted by a guy who does a pretty reasonable Feargal Sharkey impression anyone? It’s a compelling proposition and not too bad a listen either once you get over the disappointment as the Sharkey-isms receded. 7/10
www.myspace.com/billyvincent

SB

 
 

Something Beginning With L – The Listed Building EP (Armellodie)

Don’t talk to me about listed buildings, spend half my time in my ‘proper’ job trying to sort the buggers out. But give me this EP any day. Sublime is an often overused term but this 4 track piece really is pretty much near perfect. With a total curveball, the EP kicks off with precise pop-rock of ‘Angel Sized’ which brings to mind the likes of Sky Larkin and the Four Marys. But for the remainder of the EP we move into far more woozy territory. ‘Younger Thoughts’ and ‘Expansion Ride’ a dreamy summerscapes to laze away the days with, the twin female vocals of Lucy Parnell and Jen Macro weaving a blissful scene. Closer ‘Unwittingly Beautiful’ is a darker affair with an uncanny similarity to John Murphy’s ‘In the House – In a Heartbeat’ from 28 Days Later. I say similarity, there are parts where the key changes and guitar parts are so identical I thought it was a cover version. But it is a fittingly beautiful finale to a fantastic EP. 9/10
www.myspace.com/somethingbeginningwithl

SB

 

Ruarri Joseph – Severed Dreams (ACP)

Very mild mannered acoustic stuff here from mellow voiced Ruarri Joseph. Completely unarresting, if you did have ‘Severed Dreams’ this would be pretty good for curing insomnia. 5/10

SB

 
 

Two Wounded Birds – All We Wanna Do / Midnight Wave (Moshi Moshi)

Scuzzed up puny surf pop performed in a cathedral of reverb. It’s all very analogue and crackly, which may appeal to some. Personally I’m not much of a fan of these two tracks (though I would be slightly kinder on the third, unannounced track ‘Midnight Wave’ which at least has a bit of chutzpah about it. 5/10
www.myspace.com/twowoundedbirdsofficial

SB

 

Athletes in Paris – Borrowed Time (The Animal Farm)

Interesting sound here from Athletes in Paris – super punchy production pumps through the slickly assured composition and faux-lounge underbelly to leave us with a nicely driven little song here, full of northern vowels and twinkling guitars. 6/10
www.myspace.com/athletesinparis

SB

 
 

Antlered Man – Surrounded By White Men (Something Nothing)

Very nice sounding little effort this one – great big rumbling drums and distorted bass sounds underpinning the whisperingly threatening spoken word vocals before the track eventually mutates into what could be a weird bastardised version of Billy Joel’s ‘We Didn’t Start the Fire’. It boils up into a seething mass of vitriol quite nicely. 8/10
www.antleredman.co.uk

SB

 
 

Hervé – Together (3 Beat / All Around the World)

Despite a few promising moments, I can’t get the bitter taste out of my mouth following a little bit of sick coming up whenever the cheesey acid house pianos do their thing on this track. Maybe it’s all done to be ‘ironic’ but it just reminds me of the worst club dance music I had to put up with when first going out in my provincial backwater little town. 5/10

SB

 
 

Scams – Lost For Words EP (Devil Duck)

Leedsters Scams are clearly pretty proficient musicians and vocalist Andy Morgan has a refreshingly direct take on compiling his lyrics. But even though this is a 4-track EP, there’s not a one among them that sticks in my mind particularly. Instead of four individual pieces, it feels more like one 12 minute long master mix of all who are the great and the good in current British indie music. One man’s derivative is another man’s diverse so difficult to form a strong opinion here either way. But one thing I do know – there’s a very weird sound effect during ‘Lions And Bears And Tigers’ which sounds like a gerbil has been employed to provide backing vocals – perhaps taking the animal link a shade too far. 6/10
www.wearescams.com

SB

 

Squarehead – Midnight Enchilada (Richter Collective)

I fear I may be falling foul of another current ‘trend’ or ‘scene’ in music. The surf pop revival – I just don’t get it. It may have sounded good bursting out of a mono record player in the back bedroom of your Mum and Dad’s house but the whole sound just feels very primitive and undercooked played through a modern hi-fi. Just my view admittedly, but I’m sticking to it. 5/10
www.myspace.com/squareheadmusic

SB

 
 

Spokes – 3,4,5 (Counter)

Spokes singles come at you thick and fast – it already feels like we’ve listened to the whole of their album ‘Everyone I Ever Met’ via singles releases. That said, this one is still worthy as a standalone outing. It’s not as dark and moody as some of their other work, ‘3,4,5’ is more at the euphoric, open stringed pop end of their spectrum – perfect the sunny summer evenings. 7/10
www.counterrecords.com

SB

 
 

Waka Flocka Flame – No Hands (Warner)

Starts off sounding like a male gangsta rap version of Lady Gaga. Ends up sounding like any other gangsta rap. Might make it onto Cribs or whatever it is the kids watch these days. 4/10
www.wakaflocka1017.com

SB

 
 

The Brights – A Cameo Can't Last Forever(Lemonpop UK)

It surely is not a bad thing if you can figure out bands’ influences just right from the start. It gives you clear guidance what to expect. This is what you can find in London-based The Brights’ jingle jangle pop. Though, it is not a good sign when it is more interesting to mention the influences than the band’s actual features.

Their sound can be described as light Britpop, the tunes often tend to go into a power-pop direction. Guitarist James Prudence obviously sees himself as Johnny Marr’s lost son. His pearly and clear sound shapes the Brights’ character. But already the basically very good single “A Cameo Can’t Last Forever” reveals a flaw. Singer David Burgess surely can sing. But his timbre does not fit to the combination of 60s beat and 80s jingling melancholy, but drifts into a too arbitrary power-pop voice. Also, Marr and Morrissey had their stories to tell and knew how to shape atmospheres. The Brights try too hard without remarkable outcomes. Still the funky sound that reminds of the Style Council and typically beat background ‘Wohoo Hoos’s clearly deserve their credits. But it is the strange cross-over between The Smiths and Maximo Park that steals the band’s identity. We all have heard a lot of 60s and 80s influenced British music like that before. And to be honest, those were better versions. And - off topic -just to mention another spotlight, what will The Brights say to The Crookes occupying their niche? Maybe a new gentlemanly version of 90s Britpop quarrels?

Wolfgang Günther

 
 

Twenty Twenty – Love to Life (Geffen)

Words cannot adequately serve me to describe the distaste I feel about this release. But at the expense of sounding like a less literate version of Charlie Brooker I shall try briefly. This is the sort of manufactured shite rock-pop which is created when some gluttonous record exec feeds on marketing figures and demographic analysis, washes it down with three camera friendly chappies from the home counties then excretes it as a large dollop of formulaic swill to be fed to the teen market. Zero integrity. 0/10
www.twentytwentyband.com

SB

 
 

Japanese Voyeurs – Get Hole (Fiction)

I’ve got a feeling I’m supposed to know what the hell this is about and that I might be showing some level of naivety by admitting I haven’t got a clue what ‘Get Hole’ is supposed to mean. I do know that it sounds very good though – deep overdriven guitars and an acerbic female vocal bring to mind combinations of the likes of Jesus Lizard, Courtney Love, L7, Alice in Chains et al. Grungemongous. 8/10

SB

 
 

Panda Su – I Begin (Peter Panda)

Panda Su hits just the right balance between bitter and sweet – her sugary vocals tempered by some nice glitch clicks and beats. The moments when her delivery verges on the Lily Allen cockernee geezer lady are equally weighted against the slices of sublime such as the lexicologic mantra delivered in a hybrid Portuguese/Scottish accent during ‘Alphabet Song’. 8/10
www.myspace.com/thepandasu
Download 'Alphabet Song'

SB

 
 

Francis Neve – Winterbury (FRR)

There’s a really interesting arrangement going on here – elements of Spokes, Vessels ready to just burst into life and a simple boy-girl vocal recounting the beginning of troubled relationship waters. But it just never does really burst into life, instead it maintains an impressively depressing, overwhelming sense of claustrophobia which, cunningly, is very much what the song is about. Not what I would describe as a pleasant listen but impressive nonetheless. 7/10
www.francisneve.co.uk

SB

 
 

The Dagger Brothers – Bono’s Song (Seed)

Twattishly funny The Dagger Brothers return with this wry take on charity songs/Comic Relief etc. Musically it’s based on an aged drum pattern and (possibly) a pre-set melody or autoplay setting. But as the Brothers remind us ‘give a man a quid he can buy some crisps, give a man a quid, he can buy some Lilt’ – it’s all about the giving to the little kiddies my chums. 7/10
http://soundcloud.com/seed-records/the-dagger-brothers-bonos-song

SB